Who's Who at the Laufer Center

  
Faculty
photo of ken dill

Director

Ken A. Dill is interested in the physics of how proteins fold; the microscopic origins of the unusual physical properties of water; the foundations and applications of variational entropy-based principles in statistical physics; and how the laws of physics constrain and enable the biological properties and evolution of cells. Ken is a Distinguished Professor of Physics and Chemistry at Stony Brook. (Video, Citations)
photo of carlos simmerling

Associate Director

Carlos Simmerling develops new algorithms and energy functions using state-of-the-art computers for accurate and efficient simulation of large systems of biomolecules. He also applies these methods to systems where conformational dynamics are important for function, such as slow ligand binding and DNA recognition and repair. Carlos is a Professor of Chemistry at Stony Brook.
photo of Sasha Levy Sasha Levy develops technologies using random DNA barcodes and next-generation sequencing to quantitatively study the behavior of millions of small lineages in large cell populations. He uses these tools to understand how cell populations, such as microbial pathogens or cancer, evolve; how environmental fluctuations shape evolutionary strategies; how genetic and protein-protein interaction networks change across environments; and how genetic architecture constrains the adaptive process. Sasha is an Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology at Stony Brook.
Affiliated Faculty
photo of Evangelos Coutsias Evangelos Coutsias' research has focused on the modeling of nonlinear systems and continua, using techniques of applied mathematics on problems motivated from applied physics, engineering and biology. These include asymptotics and perturbation methods for the study of stability and bifurcation phenomena in plasma physics, biology and fluid mechanics; high accuracy numerical spectral methods for solving PDEs arising in continuum mechanics; and robust numerical methods for systems of multivariate polynomials for the solution of problems of inverse kinematics arising in molecular structure studies. His present work is on the development of computational methods for the study of protein structure, especially on the kinematic geometry of protein backbones subject to constraints. Current interests focus on the refinement of protein structure and the development of computational geometric methods for the efficient exploration of macromolecular shapespaces with application to protein design and drug discovery. Evangelos is a Professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Stony Brook.
photo of Bruce Futcher Bruce Futcher researches the logic and control of cell growth and cell division circuitry, a problem that is related to the uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. In collaboration with Eckard Wimmer, Steffen Mueller and Steve Skiena, he is developing methods for creating weak synthetic viruses, which may be useful in therapies as well as biological research. Bruce is an Associate Professor of Genetics & Microbiology at Stony Brook.
photo of david green David Green is studying signaling in the G-protein pathway, to understand the specificity of protein-protein interactions; and how the HIV-1 virus recognizes its target cells, to learn how glycosylation modulates protein interactions. David is an associate professor of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Stony Brook.
photo of Tom MacCarthy Tom MacCarthy researches Evolutionary Systems Biology and Computational Immunology, often in close collaboration with experimental biologists. A primary interest is computational modeling of antibody diversity, specifically in Immunoglobulin genes. He is applying this study to B-cell lymphomas such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Tom also uses computational models to investigate the evolution of robust gene regulatory networks and to study how the gene networks that control sex determination evolve. Tom is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Stony Brook.
photo of sergei maslov Sergei Maslov researches the properties of complex networks of interactions between biological molecules, using the power of simple models to understand how they function, evolve, and withstand the impact of noise and perturbations. Sergei is a tenured scientist at Brookhaven National Laboratory.
photo of joshua rest Joshua Rest investigates the extent that changes in the expression of genes result in changes in the fitness of cells. He is examining the fitness costs for expressing certain genes at the same time, and the persistence of variations caused by genetic mutations. Joshua is an Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolution at Stony Brook. (Click here to watch my video)
photo of robert rizzo Robert Rizzo For efficient and effective drug design, the Rizzo group develops and applies computational algorithms and protocols in atomic-level modeling of how drugs bind to proteins. Rob is an Associate Professor in Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Stony Brook.
photo of michael schatz Michael Schatz develops high performance algorithms for large-scale sequence analysis, including open source informatics tools for comparative genomics and genome assembly across the tree of life. He is studying mutations associated with autism, structural variations in esophageal cancer, and developing improved methods for assembling plant genomes. Michael is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stony Brook.
Photo of Markus Seeliger Markus Seeliger works to understand the molecular mechanisms of signaling proteins, and how small molecule ligands and drugs can modulate their activity. Markus is an Assistant Professor of Pharmacological Sciences at Stony Brook Medical School. (Click here to watch my video)
photo of steve skiena Steve Skiena designs combinatorial algorithms for biology, particularly for analyzing the sequences and assembly of biological molecules and for designing synthetic genes. Steve is a Professor of Computer Science at Stony Brook. (Click here to watch my video)
photo of Bill Studier F. William Studier's research has centered on the interactions and shapes assumed by DNA, and on the molecular genetics and biochemistry of bacteriophage T7, a virus that infects E. coli bacteria and is an important research tool. E. coli bacteria are normal inhabitants of the human intestine, where they aid digestion, but some E. coli strains cause mild or serious human diseases. Recent work is aimed at understanding mechanisms of bacterial evolution by comparing genome sequences of different strains of E. coli.
photo of jin wang Jin Wang studies the physics and chemistry of biomolecules and networks with a focus on the mechanisms of protein folding, biomolecular recognition and biological networks. He uses modern statistical mechanics, simulations, and empirical information from databases to study the detailed processes involved. Jin is an Associate Professor of Chemistry and Physics at Stony Brook.